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Rosario Blefari: 4 Women No Cry
Rosario Blefari: 4 Women No Cry
Artist Rosario Blefari
Album 4 Women No Cry
Label None
Released 6/27/2005
Purchase www.m-enterprise.de
4 Women No Cry serves as a prelude to an annual compilation series instigated by Gudrun Gut (Monika) in order to draw further attention to the still underrepresented female view in music. Gudrun Gut:Nowadays, very few releases by unknown artists even get to reach the shops. The idea behind this project was prompted by my rediscovery of a fantastic LP (No NewYork) featuring four different bands with 4-5 tracks each – the perfect way to discover new artists.”

4 Women No Cry introduces four highly creative, international artists who combine outstanding songwriting talents with electronic elements, yet often – and unjustly so - remain relatively unknown. The only selection criterion: a unique, original approach to music that is continued in sound aesthetics and production.

"4 Women No Cry" kicks off with Argentinian singer Rosario Blefari’s doleful tale of separation and renunciation (Partir y Renunciar). Subtly atmospheric, yet deeply moving her gentle vocals and delicate guitar passages nestle between street sounds, their mellifluence disturbed by intricate disruptions on the follow-up Nunca. A lot of scope, a lot of unpredictability pervades Blefari’s musical excursions, until Melodia weaves her weird and wonderful melodies into a stunningly beautiful pop song. Aware of her Goslab video activities we might expect Tusia Beridze aka tba to provide a visual accompaniment to this compilation – besides journalism and media studies the Georgian tends to focus on audiovisual productions, even winning second price at the renowned Oberhausen Short Film Festival. Musically, the incredibly versatile artist (check out her latest, excellent album on max.Ernst) allows the atmospheric, narrative and culture-encompassing aspects of her work to enter the composition: with Gorod, an immensely popular, Eastern European campfire classic (as featured in the Russian film “Assa”), Beridze introduces a very personal, emotional element to this collection, followed by hypnotised, semi-somnolent confessions couched in a blend of fake strings and real feelings (Cuet). Sometimes, Beridze employs a string of casual handclaps to highlight the poignant melancholy (Wound), sometimes she twists dejection and sharp rhythms into a touching take on modern minimalism (Hextention) – in the end, her tracks sneak straight into the subconscious, like her knowing nod to the electronic excursions of compatriot and occasional collaborator Nikakoi (Late).

Aware of her Goslab video activities we might expect Tusia Beridze aka tba to provide a visual accompaniment to this compilation – besides journalism and media studies the Georgian tends to focus on audiovisual productions, even winning second price at the renowned Oberhausen Short Film Festival. Musically, the incredibly versatile artist (check out her latest, excellent album on max.Ernst) allows the atmospheric, narrative and culture-encompassing aspects of her work to enter the composition: with Gorod, an immensely popular, Eastern European campfire classic (as featured in the Russian film “Assa”), Beridze introduces a very personal, emotional element to this collection, followed by hypnotised, semi-somnolent confessions couched in a blend of fake strings and real feelings (Cuet). Sometimes, Beridze employs a string of casual handclaps to highlight the poignant melancholy (Wound), sometimes she twists dejection and sharp rhythms into a touching take on modern minimalism (Hextention) – in the end, her tracks sneak straight into the subconscious, like her knowing nod to the electronic excursions of compatriot and occasional collaborator Nikakoi (Late).